Wednesday 30 November

Matthew

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Parts 2 & 2: Osborne: You’ve Never Had It So Bad!
First up: We’re going to get your reaction to George Osborne’s speech yesterday when he told us how it’s going to be for the next six years: bad. Really, really bad.
True, fuel’s frozen for now, benefits will go up with inflation but those striking public sector workers got a massive kicking from the chancellor with more jobs cuts and no hope of a decent pay rise.

Does Osborne’s tough medicine have your approval, that’s what we’re going to find out before it’s over to Mark for the rest of the day’s headlines.

Part 4: Today’s Papers

Part 5: Soft Options No Option For Uni
Moving on, are so called soft options like art, drama and media studies no option now universities have admitted they’ve got a downer on them? Our top institutions reckon they’re a sign students aren’t up for challenging themselves with harder subjects like maths and science. Would you encourage your kids to take those subjects for GCSE and A Level when you know unis and employers will turn their noses up? Or is it better for them to get top grades, no matter what they’re in?

Part 6: Dad: I Don’t Wanna Be Like You!
Mum, dad, I don’t want to be like you! Does every breeder secretly want their sprogs to share their interests? For thousands of years we’ve passed our trade and our wealth to our children. Not so much these days, though: education has changed all that. Psychologists warn this can lead to some parents feeling alienated by their sprogs. Does that chime with you? Pick up the phone and let us know.

Part 7: Hello, I Love You, Won’t You Tell Me Your Name?
And finally: Hello, I love you, won’t you tell me your name? Have you ever stopped a stranger and told them you fancy them? Maybe you’ve been on the receiving end of a spontaneous display of affection from a random person. All we want to know is what happened next?

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Comments (17)

  • Trish

    over 2 years ago

    Trish

    Being a teacher, I have no problems working to 67 (if I am still physically able) and understand that in the current climate, reforms are needed. What I do have a problem with is the general dictorial attitude of this government of 'do as I say not as I do'. The cut in public sector pensions would be much more tolerable if the MPs also had considerable reforms in their benefits/ pensions/ 'expenses'. So not really 'all in this together' then.

  • Trish

    over 2 years ago

    Trish

    @Dean. I absolutely agree with you on this point. Not too long ago, the Goverment was brainstorming plans to entice more highly qualified applicants into teacher training (i.e. First Class Honours/ Masters etc.) with large cash incentives. However, with the benefits afforded to the public sector (and morale) being constantly eroded by this present Government, do they actually think that people intelligent/ diligent enough to obtain these qualifications would opt to go into teaching rather than use their abilities to secure a better paid job in the private sector?

  • Dean

    over 2 years ago

    Dean

    This horrible situation with public sector workers can only end one way-another brain drain. Our nurses, teachers etc, the backbone of our nation will leave these shores looking for better working conditions, better pay and appreciation. Students wont be drawn to these professions, prefering instead to go for those that pay hard cold cash. The message is simply this from the government: Greed is still good, get yours and dont worry and the other guy.

  • Cathy

    over 2 years ago

    Cathy

    Not just MP's pensions, but Union leaderrs will look forward to fantastic pensions too!!!

  • ken hawkins

    over 2 years ago

    ken hawkins

    Funny that as we are "all in it together" the most golden of all public sector pensions and golden handshakes, MP's perks are not being cut. What a suprise

  • Kathy Carroll

    over 2 years ago

    Kathy Carroll

    I am self employed with a private pension and I have seen £8,000 knocked off the value of my pension since 2009 and I will be working till I'm 67 and possibly longer.I wish I had the stability of a public sector job! Work in the building sector is scarce and we are living off what savings we have and are hoping that things will get better . I have appilied for other jobs but can't get any because of my age and lack of references etc.I wish the 'public sector' workers would stop whining and think about others for a change.

  • Peter

    over 2 years ago

    Peter

    Peter Private sector pensions have decreased due to the state of the economy. people are living in poverty because of Gov cutbacks on benefits. Public sector workers have got to work 2 more years to get their oversized pensions. booo hoo

  • michael

    over 2 years ago

    michael

    private sector roles is to create wealth, public is to do necessary community/public roles but there many in both sectors not doing a lot. pitting public and private against each other is wrong! they should be looking at the whole job market structure. we have forced more and more people to do more work for little extra pay, meanwhile forcing the disabled out of the jobs market creating inequality

  • michael

    over 2 years ago

    michael

    people are forgetting we live in a service sector economy, which clearly hasnt paid its way. making people unemployed in a service sector economy will not build our way out of debt. they have less money and if people around the world dont buy our services we are in trouble. many people are in the private sector like hairdressers, management consultants,.pizza shop owners, none of these travel very well and unless you have loads of tourists using these services its a waste of time, , its all common sense and logical, we dony have enough manufacturing, which the last tory government got rid of, we are underbalanced in manufacturing and over balanced in services, how many supermarkets do you need? cheers

  • michael

    over 2 years ago

    michael

    i cannot understand where the govermment get the idea from taxpayers are paying for these pensions, public workers are taxpayers, everyone who legitimately pays tax is a taxpayer. they.are making hundreds.of thousands unemployed who will not pay tax and will.not help this country out of debt. they.say.we are all.living longer, but many die from disease every year. secondly there is a huge number of private sector workers who dont do.physical work week in and week out. they.are expecting people who do physical work to work the same amount of time as somewhere behind a desk. this all depends on what work you do. also the reality is we have been borrowing money way before labour came to power. we got rid of large number of manufacturing jobs, we have three quarters of people in the private sector yet it seems they clearly havent earned enough for the country to get us out of debt, we have borrowed more than we needed, we have overspent that is the reality! clearly the economic policies havent worked. the government is just blaming ordinary people both public.and private and also the people at the top who created the mess ask the hard workers at the bottom pay the price. private sector workers should be demanding better pay and conditions not pull everyone else down to the low levels. if private sector employees want no pensions.and will suffer when their older, then thats their fault, the state pension is so bad, people cannot have a descent standard of living. if they are walked over its their fault.

  • Daniel

    over 2 years ago

    Daniel

    Why do we just not take all the land off the aristocracy? They didnt earn it, they have it because one of their ancestors knew the right person. Our richest citizen is a land inheritor, we gave africa back to the africans, we gave india back to the indians why not back to the british?

  • Len/Lisa Bentley RS

    over 2 years ago

    Len/Lisa Bentley RS

    steady Max. Cameron is only worth 60 million Gabby Logan is worth a quarter of that, And she pays big tax bill. the poor are always with us . So are the rich. There are people sleeping in shop doorways in the richest part of London. They should have been helped years ago.

  • Max Nottingham

    over 2 years ago

    Max Nottingham

    Autumn statement Cam and Ossie millionaires wack the poor. Its because they were stopped foxhunting. Millionaires Cabinet makes poor people poorer. Vince Cable should resign

  • Laura

    over 2 years ago

    Laura

    With regard to 'soft subjects' at uni, I'm studying an art & design course, which is apparently a soft subject. I'm studying graphic design which i would NOT describe as soft. It's incredibly hard work and constant work - there are no lulls after handing in essays like some subjects, & at you need a good level of education and intelligence. So to say it could be classed as a subject which people do as an easy option is totally wrong!!!

  • Anon

    over 2 years ago

    Anon

    A pension is an insurance policy. If the person dies, as Thatcher would love, at the age of 64, the government keeps the cash!!

  • janice

    over 2 years ago

    janice

    I amreally alarmed and disapointed to observe comments stating the tax payer pays my pension.I am a tax payer and I am also a public sector worker that has worked for 32 years and paid a substantial amount of money towards my pension we don't get it for free from the tax payer and we also pay into the state pension along side of this .I have observed all the recent comments relating to my pension payout but failed to observe the details that show the large amounts of pension we already pay towards.The private sector need also to remember that we do a job that puts our own lives at risk every day ie; violence,infection,should I go on!! If people are abusing sickness then deal with them don't punish the rest of us.

  • Annette

    over 2 years ago

    Annette

    The Autumn Statement was quite depressing but really brought home the state of the economy. Bad though it is the UK is in a better state than the rest of Europe. The public sector workers are paid by the tax payer andwe simply cannot afford to subsidise inefficiency any longer eg high levels of sickness/absence running at 6% - this equates to everyone taking 15 days off sick each year - rediculous!

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