ONLINE BULLYING: WEEK 4

/ 31 January 2019

Since our series began, Do The Right Thing has heard from a number of concerned parents and teachers who are worried about the effect that cyberbullying can have upon our young people.

This week we heard from Julie, who wrote into the show about her 16-year-old daughter Sarah (not their real names). Sarah has been mercilessly bullied both in person and online and has been driven to self-harm.  At the end of last year Sarah was hospitalized for her own safety. Her mum is devastated that her beautiful daughter has been permanently scarred for life and is seriously worried about her future safety. She was very disappointed in how Sarah’s school dealt with the bullying and wrote in saying that things need to change.

Joining Esther in the studio was Professor Ann John whose recent study found that young victims of cyberbullying are twice as likely to attempt suicide and self-harm as those who have been bullied face to face. She called for all schools to include cyber-bullying in their anti-bullying strategies as well as providing digital citizenship lessons to teach children about being safe online. She also suggested that schools should recognise the vulnerability of both the perpetrator and the victim involved in bullying and that there should be a strong focus on supporting both parties.

If you have been affected by any of the issues above please see below for available sources of help:

Harmless, provides information and support for people who self harm or are at risk of suicide as well as their friends, families and professionals who are working with them. If you would like to know more about Harmless, visit their website on http://www.harmless.org.uk/.

Childline is also there day and night if you need someone to talk to. If you would like to get in contact with Childline, you can call them on 0800 1111 or visit their website www.childline.org.uk for more ways to get in touch.

Other sources of help / information:

For support and advice about bullying and cyberbullying, visit the NSPCC website on: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/child-abuse-and-neglect/bullying-and-cyberbullying/

If you’d like to get in contact with the National Bullying Helpline, visit nationalbullyinghelpline.co.uk

If you’d like to get in contact with Bully Busters, visit bullybusters.org.uk

If you are under 25 and need someone to talk to The Mix offer support and advice for young people. They can help with all sorts of problems from mental health to self-harm, from homelessness to finding a job, from break-ups to drugs. You can call them on 0808 808 4994 or visit their website www.themix.org.uk for more ways to get in touch.

If you need help, because your child is refusing to attend school as a result of bullying or other trauma, you can find out more about Red Balloon on www.redballoonlearner.org or by calling 01223 366052 or emailing admin@group.rblc.org.uk.

If you would like to know more about The Diana Award and their work in schools to combat bullying, visit their website on: https://diana-award.org.uk/anti-bullying/

If you’d like to get in contact with Anti-Bullying Pro, visit www.antibullyingpro.com/support-centre

If you would like to visit the Ofsted Parent View website use the following link: https://parentview.ofsted.gov.uk/